Impeachment Season

First Andrew Johnson, then Bill Clinton, now Donald Trump. On December 18, 2019, President Trump became the third president in American history to be impeached. Sophomore Andrew Towers has been following the recent impeachment events and the circumstances preceding them.

“[Trump] was impeached over meddling in Ukraine,” Towers said. “He withheld millions of dollars of military aid towards Ukraine that had been OK’d by Congress for his own personal gain because he was looking for dirt on Joe Biden.”

As per the Constitution, Vice President Mike Pence would become the new president if Trump were to be removed from office. Towers gave his opinion on what it would be like to have Pence as president.

“I think Pence would be a more strategic president,” Towers said. “I think he would have more of an actual long-term ‘this is what we’re gonna do,’ but at the same time, I’m personally opposed to his policies.”

A presidential removal would also affect the country and its overall views toward the government.

“I think [removal] would be politically stabilizing,” Towers said. “There are a lot of people who are very hard-set on him staying president and there are a lot of people who are against that which sets up a very toxic reality.”

Not all students believe that removing the president from office would be stabilizing. Junior Gabe Foley expressed a different belief about the impacts of a potential removal.

“It would be much more polarizing,” Foley said. “But we would also have Mike Pence as president for however much time he has, and no one can really tell what he would do.”

One factor affecting these differing views of the president could be his usage of social media, especially Twitter. Foley noted how people can be affected differently by his Twitter habit.

“For Republicans [social media] is definitely positive because he spreads his impact,” Foley said. “But some people, like the media, especially, will take it and use it against him.”

Towers held a similar view on the impact of Trump’s social media usage.

“There are certain people who absolutely love his constant, incessant use of Twitter,” Towers said. “But there are others who are very vehemently opposed who think that it’s what they would call unpresidential.”

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