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February 6, 2018

Education…at what cost?

With spring break a couple weeks from now, everyone is talking about snow days and two-hour delays. Yet, while sleeping in and staying at home all day seems great, the idea of going to school during the spring to make up the lost days is not very inviting. Because of the chilly wind and icy roads, snow days and delays are common during the first couple weeks after winter break.

Road conditions often require students and parents to drive slower and with more caution, but it does not mean they are unsafe. Delays give the extra time to drive carefully without cancelling a whole day of school. During those two hours, roads can also be cleared of snow or ice and allow temperatures to warm up for students who wait for the bus outside or walk to school. Though the classes are shortened to just under 30 minutes, delays make sure students are safe while still providing them with an education.

While snow days guarantees the safety of students when the roads are dangerous, they have to be made up. The second week of spring break is the snow make-up days, and additional snow days will be made up with eLearning days when students work on their laptops from home. A lot of people are opposed to snow days because of having to give up part of their spring break, but under some conditions, they are necessary.

High schoolers who recently got their license have less experience driving in winter conditions, making going to school more dangerous without a snow day or delay. While it is important to have students attend school on a regular schedule, it is not worth the risk of endangering students, parents and faculty. Ultimately, it is the families’ choice to send their children to school, but having a delay or snow day ensures that everyone is safe and off the dangerous roads. The schools’ priority is supplying an education, but at what cost?

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